NABOKV-L post 0010758, Thu, 9 Dec 2004 12:58:41 -0800

Subject
Re: Fwd: more on bacula (for the List?)
Date
Body
EDNOTE. Could the sudden surge of interest in racoon & walrus bacula, reflect
insidious propaganda from the penile implant industry? There are also serious
issues of patent rights involved. Animal rights activists -- EN GARDE!
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----- Forwarded message from bwarren@uclink.berkeley.edu -----
Date: Thu, 09 Dec 2004 11:04:26 -0800
From: Barry Warren <bwarren@uclink.berkeley.edu>

Readers,

The recent novel "Sarah" by wunderkind J. T. Leroy incorporates abundant
references to raccoon penis-bones. Although having no particular literary
relevance to Nabokov studies, this novel and Leroy's follow up anthology of
linked stories, "The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things," are highly
recommended to all literature lovers. Read them now, before the looming
Hollywoodized versions desecrate them forever!

Barry Warren

At 11:58 AM 12/6/2004, you wrote:


>----- Forwarded message from chaiselongue@earthlink.net -----
> Date: Sun, 05 Dec 2004 09:58:41 -0800
> From: Carolyn <chaiselongue@earthlink.net>
>
>I had no idea - - it turns out that human males are singular among mammals
>in not having a penis bone! In fact, for those who envy such things, you can
>even buy baculae on the internet:
>
>Peter I was an oddity in many ways; perhaps he was a throwback of some kind
>or else, perhaps, an implant from a very large animal was the viagra of the
>day?
>-----------------------------------------
>EDNOTE. As far as I recall, the Kunstkammer exhibition in question was not
>Peter I's (most) person possession, although I vaguely recall reading a novel
>centering on Napoleon's. NB, BTW, VN's interest in lepidoptera genitalia.
>The technical term BACULUM (penis bone) offers some charming wordplay
>possibilities. The plural is BACULA. BACULUS (with plural BACULI) is "a staff
>of authority, esp. one that is symbolic of authority (as the pastoral staff of
>a bishop." Compare VaN's ADA play on STIGMA (bad) vs its plural STIGMATA
>(good).
>----------------------------------------------------------
>EDNOTE. SEE below for possible holiday gifts for the guy who has (ALMOST)
>everything.
>-----------------------------------------------------
>Bacula
>Number one question at The Bone Room? What is a Bacula?! A bacula is
>essentially a penis bone found in many species of mammals. It is a large
>very dense bone uniquely shaped for each species and often used as an aid in
>classification of otherwise similar species. As could be expected, it is
>found only in males. The baculum is one of several heterotropic skeletal
>elements­ëi.e., bones dissociated from the rest of the body skeleton. It is
>found in all insectivores (e.g., shrews, hedgehogs), bats, rodents, and
>carnivores and in most primates except humans. Such wide distribution
>suggests that it appeared early in mammalian evolution.
>Coyote Bacula $2.50 each
>Fox Bacula $2.50 each
>Mink Bacula $2.50 each
>Otter Bacula $6.50 each
>Raccoon Bacula $3.50 each
>Seal (fossilized) Bacula $20-$35 each
>
>----- End forwarded message -----
>Dear Don,
>
>I had no idea - - it turns out that human males are singular among mammals
>in not having a penis bone! In fact, for those who envy such things, you
>can even buy baculae on the internet:
>
>Peter I was an oddity in many ways; perhaps he was a throwback of some
>kind or else, perhaps, an implant from a very large animal was the viagra
>of the day?
>
>Bacula
>Number one question at The Bone Room? What is a Bacula?! A bacula is
>essentially a penis bone found in many species of mammals. It is a large
>very dense bone uniquely shaped for each species and often used as an aid
>in classification of otherwise similar species. As could be expected, it
>is found only in males. The baculum is one of several heterotropic
>skeletal elements–ëi.e., bones dissociated from the rest of the body
>skeleton. It is found in all insectivores (e.g., shrews, hedgehogs), bats,
>rodents, and carnivores and in most primates except humans. Such wide
>distribution suggests that it appeared early in mammalian evolution.
>Coyote Bacula $2.50 each
>Fox Bacula $2.50 each
>Mink Bacula $2.50 each
>Otter Bacula $6.50 each
>Raccoon Bacula $3.50 each
>Seal (fossilized) Bacula $20-$35 each

Barry Warren
<bwarren@uclink4.berkeley.edu>
642-5002

----- End forwarded message -----