Johnson, D. Barton. Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita and Gene Stratton-Porter's A Girl of the Limberlost. 1999

Author(s)
Bibliographic title

Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita and Gene Stratton-Porter's A Girl of the Limberlost

Publisher, city
Periodical or collection
Russian Studies in Literature
Periodical issue
v. 35, no. 4
Page(s)
16-28
Publication year
Comment
Abstract

Lolita's second part opens with a resume of Humbert's and Lo's travels from August 1947 to August 1948 when they settle in at 14 Thayer Street in Beardsley. Humbert is concerned about Lo's education:

I also decided that anything was better for Lo than the demoralizing idleness in which she lived. I could persuade her to do so many things—their list might stupefy a professional educator; but no matter how 1 pleaded or stormed, I could never make her read any other book than the so-called comic books or stories in magazines for American females. Any literature a peg higher smacked to her of school, and though theoretically willing to enjoy A Girl of the Limberlost or Arabian Nights or Little Women, she was quite sure she would not fritter away her "vacation" on such highbrow reading matter. (Appel 1970, 175)