NABOKV-L post 0010327, Wed, 8 Sep 2004 09:56:16 -0700

Subject
DN re illicit e-mail & "Author's Copies"
Date
Body
EDNOTE. Several list subscribers have received mailings purportedly
from Dmitri Nabokov but in fact from another party. Treat accordingly.

-------- Original Message --------
From: - Wed Sep 08 09:32:53 2004
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From: Dmitri Nabokov
To: "'D. Barton Johnson'" <chtodel@cox.net>
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Dmitri Nabokov would like to assure everyone concerned that he had
nothing to do with the paranoid pastiche recently received by List
members and others. These are clearly the workings of a deranged and
perhaps drugged mind. Furthermore, one is advised to exercise caution in
opening the "forum links" that the letter contains. The news from
Russia about the Museum's future and Mr. Putin's decree on copyright
protection -- in both cases the fruit of long efforts -- is much
more interesting and cheerful than this obscene trash.


With regard to Hiroo Yamagata's query, the answer is simple. In many
cases publishers, agents, etc. did not bother to return books they had
asked to borrow for various reasons. To encourage their return, my
parents adopted the policy of marking them as "Author's copies." If the
inscription carries a date, it was probably to make sure the
book returned while they were not absent on a long trip. Some such books
may contain notations and corrections for future printings. Generally it
was my mother who inscribed, so as not to burden VN or abet the sleazy
commerce in autographs. The copy of SO in question was unquestionably
inscribed by her, as was the BS. The VéN inscription for the magazine
questionnaire was an amusingly elaborate version of her own hand,
or it might just be possible that it was a jocular imitation by VN. The
"Author's copies" should of course have been returned. No boxes of books
were forgotten at the hotel after Mother's death or donated by hotel
managers -- I saw to that. The autographed Lolita offered for sale is
vaguely redolent of a rat. If the dealer can prove its authenticity,
I'll be glad to buy it at that price.

Hiroo might haved saved himself trouble if, before conjecturing about
literary intrgues, he (?) had realized that I am still around and am
pretty wee informed about such things.

Best greetings,

DN