NABOKV-L post 0004463, Sat, 9 Oct 1999 08:47:52 -0700

Subject
Pushkin & Nabokov exhibit at U. of Washington Library
Date
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From: Michael Biggins <mbiggins@u.washington.edu>
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Russian Writers Celebrated in Suzzallo/Allen Library Exhibit on the
University of Washington campus (October 11 - December 14)

Black King, White Knight--A Centennial Celebration of Two Russian Writers
is the title of a fall quarter exhibit on the Allen Library mezzanine
which marks the bicentennial and centennial, respectively, of two authors
widely acknowledged as geniuses of Russian and American literary culture,
Alexander Pushkin (born 1799) and Vladimir Nabokov (born 1899).

Using materials from the UW Libraries' collections, the exhibit highlights
major achievements of both writers. Captions featuring key quotations from
their work convey the essence of these writers' unique creative impulse.

The exhibit also features a facsimile edition of Pushkin's sketchbooks, a
collection of manuscript letters written and signed by Nabokov, and,
courtesy of UW's Burke Museum, specimens of the butterfly family
Lycaenidae (also known as Blues), about which Nabokov was an expert.
Computer access to multimedia resources pertaining to both Nabokov and
Pushkin is also provided. The exhibit is being staged by UW Slavic
Languages and Literatures graduate students D. Lynne Walker and Sofiya
Yuzefpolskaya, with support from the UW Libraries and UW's Department of
Slavic Languages & Literatures.
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Address inquiries to:
Mike Biggins, the Slavic Librarian at the University of Washington.
He also has a Ph.D. in Russian Literature from the University of Kansas,
home to Stephen Parker and _The Nabokovian_. This is the second Nabokov
exhibit in three years -- the first one was on Nabokov and Szeftel after
_Pniniad_ came out. Lynne Walker, who was responsible for the Nabokov
display, is a Ph.D. student in our department and a frequent contributor
to Nabokv-L. The exhibit is in the most central part of the library where
it's impossible to miss it.